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The Need for New Models to Measure the Impact of Prevention

      Ever since the Declaration of Alma-Ata of 1978, and later reconfirmed in the Declaration of Astana in 2018, health promotion and disease prevention was recognized as central to the role of primary healthcare [
      Declaration of Alma-Ata International Conference on primary health care, Alma-Ata, USSR, 6-12 September 1978.
      ,
      Global Conference on primary health care from Alma Ata towards universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals.
      ]. However, despite longstanding and widespread agreement on the centrality of prevention to the public health agenda [
      • Newman G.
      (1932). The Rise of Preventive Medicine.
      ], and except for immunization, the health sector remains challenged to meaningfully include prevention, focusing more on conspicuous health issues. This has meant preventive interventions were not translated into viable models for service delivery. We argue this is in part due to an unrealistic expectation to show an impact on mortality and/or morbidity and that new models are needed to measure the impact of preventive interventions.
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      References

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