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JAH Intersection: An Introduction and Invitation

      The editors of the Journal of Adolescent Health are proud to announce the relaunch of the Perspectives section as JAH Intersection and the formal processes that we have developed over the past year to support its success. JAH Intersection intends to deepen our insights into the health and well-being of adolescents and young adults in a way that can augment scientific peer-reviewed research. JAH Intersection now has a dedicated Editor and Selection Committee to provide leadership and guidance. The committee decided to rename the Perspectives section to create a unique space within the literature dedicated to the intersection of the arts and science with a focus on sharing reflections about adolescence and young adulthood. Amplifying the multiple meanings of “intersection” is intentional.
      The integration of arts into scientific journals is not new. The New England Journal of Medicine has been publishing Perspectives pieces for decades, and similarly acclaimed journals such as the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and the Annals of Internal Medicine regularly publish narratives, poetry, and art. In its previous Perspectives section, the JAH has published several creative pieces, including a poem by SAHM past-president Tamera Coyne-Beasley [
      • Coyne-Beasley T.
      Perspectives on adolescence and young adulthood.
      ] and a “A Letter to My Doctor” by Melissa Engle, who writes about the complicated web of gratitude and empowerment that she feels as a young person with chronic disease in the hands of an extraordinary clinician [
      • Engle M.
      A letter to Mydoctor.
      ]. In addition to increasing the person-centeredness of clinical care and research, written narratives and visual art have been shown to foster reflective practices in medical education [
      • Liu G.Z.
      • Jawitz O.K.
      • Zheng D.
      • et al.
      Reflective writing for medical students on the Surgical Clerkship: Oxymoron or Antidote?.
      ,
      • Milota M.M.
      • van Thiel G.
      • van Delden J.J.M.
      Narrative medicine as a medical education tool: A systematic review.
      ], promote professional formation across multiple specialties [
      • Kissler M.J.
      • Saxton B.
      • Nuila R.
      • Balmer D.F.
      Professional formation in the Gross Anatomy Lab and narrative medicine: An exploration.
      ,
      • Miller E.
      • Balmer D.
      • Hermann N.
      • et al.
      Sounding narrative medicine: Studying students' professional identity development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
      ], and enhance observation and communication skills [
      • Wellbery C.
      • McAteer R.A.
      The art of observation: A Pedagogical Framework.
      ,
      • Mukunda N.
      • Moghbeli N.
      • Rizzo A.
      • et al.
      Visual art instruction in medical education: A narrative review.
      ]. JAH Intersection supports the benefits of integrating the arts and sciences in ways that can contribute to efforts to improve adolescent and young adult health.
      When scientific journals open their doors to these creative expressions and interpretations of health, readers gain a better understanding of the multifaceted lives of the subjects, the participants, the “n” described in peer-reviewed science articles. We also gain a better understanding of our communities and ourselves as key stakeholders in health. Imagine reading a journal full of the latest breaking research and clinical updates on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and then turning to an essay written by a young doctor with a chronic lung disease struggling with the social obligation to serve on the front lines and personal risk she will undoubtedly accrue if she does so [
      • Tsai C.
      Personal risk and Societal obligation amidst COVID-19.
      ]. This is the case in a recent issue of the JAMA, wherein the deeply personal narrative of a young woman is additive to the medical community at large, who gain a better understanding of how this disease affects young people, health-care workers, and those with chronic disease in a deeper, more personal way. In the same creative vein, in 2018, the JAMA published two pieces of visual art by Dylan Mortimer, a young man living with cystic fibrosis [
      • Milliken E.J.T.
      Cystic fibrosis in art.
      ]. Mortimer's art is a purposeful exploration of the infantilism that characterizes the life of an adult living with a chronic disease or disability. He intentionally uses glittery and cartoon-like mediums while portraying the gravity and mortality of living with a diagnosis like his. Both of these examples of written and visual art augment the objective science that medical journals offer.
      JAH Intersection specifically focuses on adolescents and young adults, who are at the intersection of childhood and adulthood. There are multiple intersections within this phase of development—dependence and independence, opportunity and risk, intense connections and need for privacy, health and illness. Likewise, as multidisciplinary professionals committed to improving adolescent and young adult health and well-being, we recognize the intersection of contributions from medicine, public health, education, community, policy, media, culture, and families. JAH Intersection aims to create a space to share reflections within this very broad context to deepen our insight into the health and lives of young people.
      We invite your submissions!
      JAH Intersections is a platform for sharing creative and artistic work from young people, their families, community members, teachers, and health professionals about adolescence and young adulthood. Submitted work may take the form of written word (e.g., stories, poetry, personal narratives) or images (e.g., photographs or two-dimensional artwork). Submissions from persons under the age of 18 years must be accompanied by written permission to submit from a legal guardian. If the submission involves a true patient story or image, the patient must be adequately deidentified and the author/artist must obtain the patient's written permission for publication and current contact information. This should be provided in a cover letter to the editorial team upon submission. Items accepted for publication in JAH Intersection may also be used by the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine for professional educational and awareness purposes, and the person who submitted the work will always be acknowledged. Submissions are reviewed and selected by the JAH Intersection Selection Committee and published at the discretion of the JAH Intersection Editor, the Editor-in-Chief, and the Associate Editors. Guidelines for authors can be found at: https://www.jahonline.org/content/authorinfo.
      We never imagined that the inauguration of JAH Intersection would be during a pandemic. But here we are. In this issue's piece, “Silver Linings Pandemic,” Dr. Zachary McClain explores the loss of everyday routine and familiarity with the onset of COVID-19, and the unexpected growth and joy he finds possible in seeing young people on their own turf [
      • McClain Z.
      Silver Linings Pandemic.
      ]. McClain's piece offers not only a refreshing optimism that is welcomed during such trying times, but also examines the added benefit of technological innovation with our patient population in particular. Could it be that teens are more comfortable in front of a screen in their bedroom than in our offices? Might they feel less vulnerable? More empowered to ask questions and to ask for time alone with their provider? McClain sheds light on this all.
      At this time, we particularly invite JAH Intersection submissions that represent reflections from young people, their families, community members, teachers, and health professionals about adolescence and young adulthood within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. These submissions will receive prioritized review.
      We are hopeful that the depth and diversity of reflection in JAH Intersection will bolster and enhance our efforts to understand and serve young people around the world. We would like to acknowledge and express appreciation to members of the JAH Intersection Selection Committee for their valuable contributions to this effort.

      JAH Intersection Selection Committee

      Sophie Banspach
      MPH Candidate 2021, New York, New York, United States
      Lonna Gordon, M.D.
      Orlando, Florida, United States
      Torrina Harris
      Communities of Care Coordinators, Family Service Center of Galveston County, Galveston, Texas, United States
      Yu-Hui Huang, M.D.
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
      Obinna Johnesther
      Chief Development Director/CEO, HORDINT Network, Awka, Nigeria
      Roanna Kessler, M.D.
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
      Janet Lydecker, Ph.D.
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States
      Jean Mastrianao
      High School English Teacher, Lower Merion, Pennsylvania, United States
      John Moses, M.D.
      Duke Center for Documentary Studies, Durham, North Carolina, United States
      Katie Plax, M.D.
      St. Louis, Missouri, United States
      Clarissa Schilstra
      Ph.D. Candidate, Sydney, Australia
      Tomas Silber, M.D.
      Washington, D.C., United States
      Maurice Wedner-Ross
      Political Science Undergraduate Studies, Leiden, Netherlands

      References

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        Reflective writing for medical students on the Surgical Clerkship: Oxymoron or Antidote?.
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        Narrative medicine as a medical education tool: A systematic review.
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        • Nuila R.
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        Professional formation in the Gross Anatomy Lab and narrative medicine: An exploration.
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        • Miller E.
        • Balmer D.
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        Sounding narrative medicine: Studying students' professional identity development at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
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        • McAteer R.A.
        The art of observation: A Pedagogical Framework.
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        • Moghbeli N.
        • Rizzo A.
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        Visual art instruction in medical education: A narrative review.
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        Personal risk and Societal obligation amidst COVID-19.
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        • Milliken E.J.T.
        Cystic fibrosis in art.
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        Silver Linings Pandemic.
        J Adolesc Health. 2020; 67 (138-138)