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Implementation of an Alcohol Medical Amnesty Policy at an Urban University With a Collegiate-Based Emergency Medical Services Agency

  • Brian V. Monahan
    Affiliations
    Georgetown University, School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia
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  • Jose V. Nable
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Jose V. Nable, MD, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, 3800 Reservoir Rd NW, G-CCC, Washington, DC 20007.
    Affiliations
    Georgetown University, School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia

    MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia

    Georgetown Emergency Response Medical Service, Washington, District of Columbia
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  • Vince WinklerPrins
    Affiliations
    Georgetown University, School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia

    MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Department of Family Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia

    Georgetown University, Division of Student Affairs, Washington, District of Columbia
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      Abstract

      Purpose

      Medical amnesty policies (MAPs) at universities attempt to encourage students to seek emergency medical care by reducing disciplinary sanctions. This study analyzed how a MAP affected requests for emergency medical help to a collegiate-based emergency medical services (CBEMS) agency for alcohol-related issues.

      Methods

      This before-and-after study analyzed CBEMS call data for the 6 semesters prior to and after MAP implementation. Extracted data included patient demographics, dispatch time, and requests for advanced life support (ALS) resources.

      Results

      Following MAP introduction, increases were observed in alcohol-related calls/day in the fall semesters (0.84 vs. 0.93; p < 0.01). The median time of calls decreased; 1:20 a.m. versus 12:59 a.m. (median difference 21 minutes, p < 0.001). Finally, ALS was requested less often (9.0% vs. 3.7%; odds ratio 0.39; p < 0.01).

      Conclusions

      MAP implementation at a university with a CBEMS is associated with a higher call volume, requests for service that occur earlier in the evening, and reduction in ALS requests for alcohol-related emergencies.

      Keywords

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